BARC Animal Shelter and Adoptions

Dangerous, Aggressive and Public Nuisance Dogs

What is a dangerous dog?
The State of Texas Health and Safety Code defines a Dangerous Dog as one that either:

(1) Makes an unprovoked attack on a person that causes bodily injury and occurs in a place other than an enclosure in which the dog was being kept and that was reasonably certain to prevent the dog from leaving the enclosure on its own, or;

(2) commits unprovoked acts in a place other than an enclosure in which the dog was being kept and that was reasonably certain to prevent the dog from leaving the enclosure on its own and those acts cause a person to reasonably believe that the dog will attack and cause bodily injury to that person.

Find out how to declare a dog as dangerous.

What is an aggressive dog?
Sec. 6-151 of the Code of Ordinances, Aggressive dog means a dog that meets one of the following conditions:

(1) Bites, assaults, or otherwise attacks a person without provocation on the property of the owner and causes serious bodily injury to the person, provided that the person is on the property of the owner with the owner's consent or invitation;

(2) Has displayed aggressive tendencies that cause a person of normal sensibilities to fear the dog will attack that person or a domesticated animal without provocation while inside an enclosure, and such enclosure is not sufficient to ensure the safety of persons or domesticated animals on adjoining property or the public at large;

(3) Has otherwise interfered with the freedom of movement of persons in a public right-of-way, regardless of whether the dog was on the property of its owner; or

(4) A peace officer or animal control officer has reason to believe the dog has a dangerous disposition and is likely to be harmful to humans or other domestic animals.

Find out how to declare a dog as aggressive.

What is a public nuisance dog?
Public nuisance  dog shall mean any  dog that meets one of the following conditions:

(1) Substantially interferes with the right to enjoyment of life or property by persons other than the owner by acts including, but not limited to, frequent, long, or continued barking or howling, repeated defecation on property other than that of the owner, or damaging property other than that of the owner;

(2)Attacks domestic animals;

(3) Is documented by BARC, a police officer, a neighborhood protection official or a member of the public to be running at large three or more times in a 12-month period; or

(4) Is one of a number of  dogs or other animals maintained on the property owned or controlled by its owner so as to be dangerous to the public health, safety or welfare.

Find out how to declare a dog as a nuisance.