Share Share
Health and Human Services

Contacts: Kathy Barton
832-393-5045
 
Porfirio Villarreal
832-393-5041

Women & Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day event to combine beauty tips with advice on healthier sex practices

The Houston Department of Health and Human Services (HDHHS), LAMIK Beauty and Franklin Beauty School will team up on March 10 to host “Status Red,” an evening to increase HIV awareness and encourage women and girls to get tested for HIV. Status Red participants will receive beauty and health tips, manicures and makeup demonstrations with an emphasis on healthier sex practices.

Funded through the Office of Women’s Health, the event will include the launch of LAMIK Beauty’s creation Status Red, a lip gloss to honor National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. Proceeds will go to the Health Department Foundation to help with prevention services offered by HDHHS’ Bureau of HIV/STD and Vital Hepatitis Prevention.

“LAMIK Beauty has always put women’s health issues first and foremost” said Kim Roxie, creative director at LAMIK. “Creating Status Red lip gloss is just one of the many ways we aid in helping with awareness and empower women to get tested and know their HIV status.”

Every 35 minutes in the United States, a woman tests positive for HIV/AIDS. In Houston and Harris County, one in 90 Houstonians is HIV positive. Women in Houston follow the national trend with infection rates hovering around 20 percent and one in four women living with HIV/AIDS is black. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HIV/AIDS is the leading cause of death for black women aged 25 to 34.

“It is imperative that we keep attention on the epidemic and ensure that women, and more importantly young girls, receive all of the support necessary to prevent HIV infections” said Marlene McNeese-Ward, Bureau Chief, HIV/STD and Viral Hepatitis Prevention. “We cannot afford to let up the pressure. This event serves as an opportunity for organizations and individuals to come together to create understanding, offer support, encourage discussion, and most importantly get an HIV test during routine medical care.”

“We all have a vested interest to ensure the health of our community,” said Roxie. “HIV is a tough subject to talk about and this is an opportunity to engage women, girls and community leaders in open discussion on the importance of getting tested.”