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Hermann Estates building, Fire Station No. 2 and three distinctive homes receive historic designation Hermann Estates building, Fire Station No. 2 and three distinctive homes receive historic designation
On October 1, 2014, Houston City Council designated the Jack R. and Auban Tenison House, the Forrest and Myrtle Oldham House, the Hortense Sparks and William Ward/M.D. Anderson House, and the Fire Station No. 2 as historic landmarks. Council also designated the Hermann Estate Building as a Protected Historic Landmark.
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Mad about Mid Century? Mad about Mid Century?
Welcome to the Glenbrook Valley Historic District! Established as Houston's 20th historic district in 2011, Glenbrook Valley is a planned community of 1,254 homes in Southeast Houston. It was developed by Fred McManus between 1953 and 1962.
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High First Ward Historic District established High First Ward Historic District established
On May 28, 2014, the High First Ward becomes the City's 22nd Historic District. The High First Ward Historic District is located in Houston's First Ward. Today, the term "First Ward" has come to refer to the area bounded by Washington Avenue to the south, I-10 to the north, I-45 to the east and Sawyer Street to the west.
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Rafter Tales: Telling the stories of historic Houston Rafter Tales: Bigger is not always better
Just ask Chris Ferguson. Through Ferguson Home Group, Chris has been building and remodeling residential and commercial properties for 7 years. He prides himself on having an eye toward emerging trends. One such trend he sees is a desire to live with affordable urban luxury – simple, but with high quality.
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Profile of a District: Avondale East and Avondale West Rafter Tales: Profile of a District - Avondale East and Avondale West
Located in the heart of the eccentric Montrose neighborhood, Avondale is a cozy community full of beautiful historic homes. It was designed to compete with other upscale neighborhoods, such as Courtland Place, Montrose, and Westmoreland. Avondale would become one of Houston’s preeminent upscale “Streetcar Subdivisions.” Today, the original Avondale neighborhood includes two historic districts: Avondale East and Avondale West, which were developed in the early twentieth century.
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Rafter Tales: Telling the stories of historic Houston Rafter Tales: What’s with the Name?
As a column dedicated to historic preservation, it just made sense to choose a name that somehow references Houston’s architectural history. Though Houston is home to a wide range of architectural styles, cottages are particularly well represented and they seem like the perfect source for a name.
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Houston's Historic Oil Buildings Houston's Historic Oil Buildings
Historic structures not only reflect exceptional architectural styling, but they also play a role in capturing a city’s heritage. Houston was profoundly affected by the discovery of oil in southeast Texas in 1901.
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Founder’s Foresight Key to Courtlandt Place Preservation Founder’s Foresight Key to Courtlandt Place Preservation
The chaos of burgeoning downtown Houston was spilling into the tranquil neighborhoods of Houston’s elite, and real estate attorney Sterling Myer saw opportunity. He purchased land outside the city limits, which would become Courtland Place. Read more.
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The Value of Historic Wood Windows The Value of Historic Wood Windows
Perhaps the most vulnerable architectural elements of any historic buildings are the windows. Sadly, windows are often relegated to secondary or third-tier importance to the building in which they are installed. But one must keep in mind that windows play a very pivotal role in the overall design and appearance of historic structures.
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Living Downtown in Historic Buildings Living Downtown in Historic Buildings
Urban sociologists are strong advocates for the idea that high-density residential/retail/cultural districts are essential elements for a dynamic city in the 21st century. Since Houston has always aspired to be a dynamic city, it is taking this advice seriously and developing high-density centers. Downtown Houston is becoming a popular one by recycling historic buildings as comfortable places to live. In preserving these buildings, environmental concerns are also being addressed by preventing tons of building materials from being deposited into landfills.
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Old Buildings are Good Business Old Buildings are Good Business
As existing buildings represent around 98% of urban building stock, there is an imperative to address their performance, rather than simply focus on new build projects. It makes good business sense to give heritage buildings a new lease on life by adapting them to serve today’s commercial demands.
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