Mayor's Office Press Release

Mayor Turner Renews Call for State and Federal Zika Funds
Florida Infections Prompt new Request

August 2, 2016 -- xxxFollowing reports of the first local mosquito-borne Zika infections in the U.S., Mayor Sylvester Turner is once again calling on the state of Texas and federal government to provide financial assistance to help fight it.
“There are already 14 confirmed cases of Zika virus being transmitted locally in Florida,” said Mayor Turner.  “I believe it is just a matter of time before Texas is in a similar situation.  Cities are the front line of defense in this battle, and we could use some financial assistance from the state and federal governments.  It makes no sense to wait until there is an outbreak here.”

Since February, the City of Houston Solid Waste Department has been conducting weekend sweeps of illegal dump sites that can serve as mosquito breeding grounds.  To date, 3,433 tons of debris and 29,130 tires have been hauled away at an annual cost of $3.6 million.  With some additional state or federal funding, the City could purchase new equipment to increase collection frequency beyond the weekends, develop and distribute educational materials informing residents of proper and free disposal options and establish three additional heavy trash drop-off locations.
Last week, the Houston Health Department was awarded $1.5 million by the Centers for Disease Control to use for surveillance, testing and prevention.  The City is already in discussion with Harris County on the best way to maximize the use of these dollars.

Houston has documented 12 travel-associated cases of Zika virus infection since the start of the outbreak in Latin America earlier this year.  Harris County has confirmed another 12 cases - 11 are travel related and one is an infant with microcephaly born to a mother who contracted the virus while traveling outside the United State.  There are a total of 80 confirmed Zika cases in Texas.  At this time, there is no evidence the virus has infected mosquito populations in the state.

In addition to the neighborhood trash sweeps, the City has public service announcements at the airports, on public transit, in city water bills and on local TV.  The health department is going door-to-door to distribute insect repellent in underserved neighborhoods, and the City’s regional public health laboratory is supporting local hospitals and clinics with Zika infection testing.

Residents are encouraged to follow the three Ds of mosquito defense: drain, dress, DEET!  Drain standing water on your property and keep hedges trimmed.  Wear long pants and long sleeves, keep windows and screens repaired and use air conditioning.  When outside, spray exposed skin with mosquito repellant containing DEET, reapply as necessary and use netting to protect babies in strollers or car seats.