Parks Master Plan

MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR

Director TurnerOver the past 11 years, it has been my pleasure to serve as the Director of the Houston Parks and Recreation Department. During this time, input from park users has helped us make changes and improvements to our park system. In 2015, we developedupdates to our Parks Master Plan.

In 2016, it is fitting that we have this Master Plan update to guide us as we celebrate our 100th year as a park system. I personally would like to thank every Houstonian who took part in the Parks Master Plan survey and helped us shape the future of Houston’s park system.

Joe Turner, Director
Houston Parks and Recreation Department.



PARKS MASTER PLAN - OVERVIEW

The 2015 Parks Master Plan is the result of a two year assessment of the City by Park Sectors, which were developed through the Parks and Open Space Ordinance. The Ordinance divided the City of Houston into 21 Park Sectors. The 21 Park Sectors were reviewed and assessed individually to create the Park Sector plans which comprise the 2015 Parks Master Plan. Recommendations were then made both for individual Park Sectors as well as on a city-wide basis through analysis of existing conditions, data analysis, and public input. The Park Master Plan was adopted by City Council in October of 2015.

Copies of the Park Master Plan presentation and the individual park sector plans are available for download at the links below.

PARK SECTORS

PARKS MASTER PLAN: PARTNERS

The Department worked in conjunction with the Trust for Public Land and the Rice University Center for Civic Leadership to produce the document. Additional partners involved in the development of the Parks Master Plan included: the COH Planning and Development Department, the COH Health and Human Services Department, the COH Housing and Community Development Department, the Houston Parks Board, Houston Galveston Area Council, Shell Center for Sustainability at Rice University and Clark Condon Associates. Volunteer Interns from the University of St. Thomas and Lone Star College were indispensable in this effort. Maps of areas of park need were created using data provided by the Trust for Public Land ParkScore™ Project.